All posts by John

Kona Sugarloaf: The White Pineapple

Complete Score: 37 / 42 = 88.1%

A White Pineapple, or Kona Sugarloaf, has white flesh with no woodiness in the center, and no acid content. It is cylindrical in shape and very sweet due to its high sugar content. I highly recommend this food to anyone who eats. Pineapples contain calcium, phosphorous, potassium and beta-carotene, as well as bromelain, a potent digestive enzyme which scavenges bacteria and parasites in the digestive system. Pineapples are a good source of manganese and Vitamin C, packing nearly all your daily serving of each in just a one cup serving.

Value

…well it’s just fantastic.

In terms of resources spent both on production and transport to get it from the farm to my kitchen, there is some significant effort involved. Fresh, ripe pineapple is expensive. It’s soft and delicate and therefore great care must be taken in its transportation. Most pineapple that gets shipped is either picked green – so it can ripen while it travels the globe – or more often it gets canned. Since this particular pineapple was a hand delivered gift from a place I’ve actually been, its value is infinite. Still, even if I had to pay the significant costs involved in getting it, I would. Fresh and ripe is the only way to eat a white pineapple, since it’s high sugar content is what you want. The value of this perfectly ripened fruit more than makes up for it’s significant cost.

Score: 5 / 5

Hmmm...sugar
Hmmm...sugar

Quality

I can say, without hesitation or hyperbole, that this was the best pineapple I’ve ever had. It was even better than the ones I had when I was actually on the farm where they grow. I imagine that has a lot to do with the relative rarity of the experience, of actually having one in Boston, that made this one extra sweet. And plus this sucker was perfectly ripe the instant my bro walked through my front door with it under his arm.

Score: 5 / 5

Innovation

There really isn’t much innovation involved in how this piece of fruit came to be in my possession. Fresh exotic fruits travel on planes every day. Being personally acquainted with the land that produced this awesome cylinder of sugar is what made it so especially enjoyable for me, though, so there is definitely a degree of uniqueness here that is unlikely to be paralleled by anything I buy from a corporation.

Score: 3 / 5

Social Benefit

In order for this pineapple to be picked and delivered while ripe, the burning of fossil fuels and a flight of about six thousand miles was required. That’s pretty extravagant just for delivering a few minerals and nutrients to my belly. But considering that the average piece of food consumed by an American travels 1500 miles before it reaches his or her plate, this super duper above average food didn’t do anything unheard of to get to me. Also, my brother did work to earn that fruit payment. And in doing so, he helped to sustain the local organic farming economy.

Score: 3 / 5

The organic jungle farm
The organic jungle farm

Freestyle!

This particular White Pineapple was hand delivered, all the way from Hawaii to Boston, by my brother, who is home for a few months from the eastern coast of the Big Island where he works on a couple organic farms. I’ve been there. We visited him, my Dad and my other brother and I, as a graduation present when I finished school. We spent a week and a half at an awesome home- turned- retreat on an organic farm in the Hawaiian jungle ( what remains of it).

When I purchase organic fruits and veggies at the market, the little stickers are my only connection to the source of that food. To have a fresh, fragrant, perfectly ripened, organic, delicious Kona Sugarloaf from the most isolated islands in the world, from a farm that I’ve been to…well it’s just fantastic.

Score: 21 / 22

Get you some.

Complete Score: 37 / 42 = 88.1%